Martha Aby received her BA from Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota and completed both her MSW and MBA at the University of Minnesota.  She has worked in the children’s mental health field for the past 13 years as a mental health case manager, crisis worker, diagnostician, outpatient therapist, clinical supervisor, mental health consultant, and instructor of clinical assessment and engagement.  Through her position in Minnesota’s Department of Human Services she created and developed new benefits for the State’s Medicaid plan to increase provider collaboration, mental health and permanency outcomes for children in foster care and targeted services that focus on the needs of transition age youth.  She is passionate that all children on Medicaid get access to high quality, effective and culturally specific mental health services.  Martha’s research, teaching and clinical interests include developing community competencies of diagnosing mental health disorders within an individual’s cultural context, assessing the impacts of moving mental health from a social service to a medical service in terms of payment and client access, and analyzing the effects of Medicaid mental health policy on recipients, providers and payment structures.  E-mail: mjaby@uw.edu


Bianca Altamirano completed her BA and MSW at Arizona State University. During both programs she worked as a research assistant on a project concerning adolescent romantic relationships, particularly Mexican American teen dating violence. She also has experience in research pertaining to the resiliency of youth living in poverty and Latino family well-being. After completion of her MSW, she was a research assistant at the Behavioral Health Disparities Curriculum Infusion Project for the National Association of Deans & Directors of Schools of Social Work. During the past several years Bianca has worked with families and adolescents involved in the behavioral health system and with Child Protective Services she has experience working with family literacy. Her primary research interests are in working with racial and ethnic minorities in areas related to trauma exposure throughout adolescence and how to support youth through culturally grounded interventions. She is also interested in learning how to effectively promote and support educational attainment, perhaps through the implementation of community-based programs to address stressors (e.g., community violence, familial stress, poverty, etc.) that can impede academic success.  E-mail:  baltamir@uw.edu


Asia Bishop earned a BA in Sociology from Western Washington University where she studied race-relations, criminology, and law. She then earned her MSW with a focus on Administration and Policy Practice from the University of Washington. Upon completion of her MSW, she worked with high risk youth on anti-gang mentoring for a small non-profit in Seattle. Afterwards, she joined the Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy at University of Washington on a number of projects related to juvenile justice reform in Washington State. She has been with the Division as a Research Analyst since the beginning of 2013, where she has honed a strong quantitative skill set while remaining passionate about systems reform for at-risk and incarcerated youth. Her research interests are focused on understanding juvenile offending behavior, particularly for Latino and African American youth who are gang involved. She is interested in policy and program development, implementation, and evaluation related to reducing gang membership among youth of color so that these youth, who are too often disproportionately affected by disadvantage and inequality, can have better opportunities to live healthy lives outside of the justice system.  E-mail: asbishop@uw.edu


Shannon Blajeski received her MSW from the University of Washington in 2005.  Shannon has worked with adults with schizophrenia and other major mental illnesses in the community since 1999 before beginning work with the implementation of evidence-based mental health practices in WA State in 2007.  Through her work with the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Division of Public Behavioral Health and Justice Policy, she has assisted with the implementation of evidence-based Program of Assertive Community Treatment (PACT) teams, Integrated Dual Disorder Treatment (IDDT) teams and the Illness Management & Recovery (IMR) model, providing clinical and program consultation and fidelity reviews.  Shannon is currently working on a qualitative study of the duration of untreated psychosis with the Early Assessment and Support Alliance (EASA) Center of Excellence in Portland, OR.  Her research interests include the social and environmental intervention angles of treatment models for adults with severe mental illness including a focus on restoration of normal social networks and reduction of the pervasive social marginalization and poverty associated with severe mental illness. E-mail: blajes@uw.edu


Tracy Brazg completed the joint MSW/MPH program at the University of Washington in 2008, an MA in Bioethics at the University of Washington in 2014, and participated in a clinical bioethics fellowship program at Seattle Childrenʼs from 2013-2016. Her research, teaching and clinical interests focus on bridging the field of social work with bioethics and healthcare. She is particularly interested in identifying and developing methods for improving interprofessional collaboration in healthcare settings, as well as in training medical social workers to participate meaningfully in ethical deliberation. Tracy is currently working on her dissertation which examines the professional identities of hospital social workers, with a focus on their experiences and competence related to interprofessional collaboration. Tracy currently works as an ethics consultant at University of Washington Medical Center and Northwest Hospital and Medical Center, and is the Assistant Director of the UW Center for Interprofessional Education, Research and Practice. E-mail: tbrazg@uw.edu


Youngjun Choi earned his BA in social welfare at Kangnam University, the first South Korean university to provide training in the field of social work. After graduating, he served as an officer in the Korean Army where he finished his military service as a 1st lieutenant with honor by the Commanding General. Youngjun then completed his MSW at Columbia University.  Since completing his MSW, he has worked on various projects for the Social Service division of the Korean government's social policy institutes. From 2011-2013,  he worked at the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs (KIHASA) and took part in research projects dealing with family policy, social surveys at the national level, population, child support policy, single mothers, multi-cultural family support and  work/family care-giving reconciliation strategies.  In 2013-2014, Youngjun worked at the National Institute of Dementia in Korea (NID) and initiated policy projects to enhance the quality of life for dementia patients and their families such as developing a national level for the early detection of dementia and care strategies.  He was also instrumental in implementing Korea's National Dementia Helpline.  Youngjun's primary research interests are the reconciliation of work/family care-giving focusing on the older-adult population. He is also broadly interested in poverty and health issues of older-adults.  Email: yjchoi81@uw.edu


Anna Constantino-Pettit completed a BA from Washington University in St. Louis (’12) and subsequently a Masters in Social Work (MSW) from the Brown School of Social Work at Washington University (’14). Anna focused her graduate coursework on clinical approaches to reducing emotional and behavioral dysregulation, with an emphasis on intergenerational effects of traumatic stress. She also completed the certificate with the WU Center for Violence and Injury Prevention, which afforded her the opportunity to collaborate with Washington University researchers in both the Schools of Medicine and Social Work. Following her graduate studies, Anna assumed the role of clinical research coordinator for the Washington University Perinatal Behavioral Health Service (PBHS), which provides education, screening, and intervention for mothers with perinatal mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders at Barnes Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, and St. Louis Children’s Hospital.  In her ongoing work with PBHS, Anna provides both therapy and case management services for women with infants in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, has written several successful grant applications to secure financial support for the program, has advocated for universal trauma-informed screening within the hospital system, and has collaborated on scholarly papers and academic presentations of the program’s innovations and impact. She was awarded an inaugural fellowship in advanced practice of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) by the STL Center for Family Development, and works intensively with adolescents in the transition to adulthood who can benefit from this evidence-based intervention. She hopes to dedicate her research career to advancing trauma-informed clinical interventions for mothers during the perinatal period in order to interrupt intergenerational cycles of traumatic stress and promote healthy attachment and infant development.  Email: acp36@uw.edu


Henry Joel Crumé earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy from the University of Oregon (2009).  After earning his BA, Joel taught English abroad in both South Korea and Mexico (2010-12). Joel earned his MSW from California State University, Fullerton (2014). As a MSW candidate at Cal State Fullerton, Joel participated in the California Social Work Education Center (CALSWEC) Title IV-E Stipend program specializing in public child welfare. After the completion of his MSW, Joel has been working with transitional-age youth as a public child welfare social worker in Richmond, California. Joel is interested in working with high-risk youth and researching interventions that promote reform in juvenile justice policy and practice. Email: crume@uw.edu                                        


Jessica De Larwelle is a Ronald E. McNair Scholar who earned a BS in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh in 2012. Throughout her education, she has worked with children and adolescents as a caretaker, a mentor, and a positive role model. Jessica earned her MSW concentrated in mental health from the University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee in 2014. While there she worked on a SAMSHA funded study which evaluated outcomes of adults who were homeless and have a dual diagnosis of mental health and substance use. Jessica’s research interest prompted her to study abroad in Bristol, England to compare U.S. policies to those used in the United Kingdom for youth aging out of foster care and their likelihood of securing stable housing. In addition to her practical experience, she has worked closely with professors on seven research projects which led to publication in two academic journals. After earning her MSW, Jessica began working as an inpatient clinical social worker with children and adolescents struggling with mental illness. Her personal experience of aging out of foster care has inspired her research interests to explore risk and protective factors that contribute to youth successfully transitioning to adulthood. Specifically she would like to evaluate interventions for youth involved in the child welfare and / or juvenile justice system and their likelihood to pursuing higher education, securing employment, receiving adequate mental health treatment, and maintaining stable housing as they age out of care. Email: delarwe@uw.edu


Hazal Erçin graduated from the department of Sociology at Middle East Technical University (METU), Ankara, Turkey; Hazal Ercin has conducted and participated in several field studies and research.  After her graduation, she had a chance to be a project assistant in a field study during which she could practice qualitative and quantitative research techniques.  Then for a year, Hazal Ercin worked in a special vocational high school that provides scholarships to students in need of economic assistance. Meanwhile, she became a graduate student at Social Policy Program at METU.  Her graduate term papers revolved around three main issues: Family, Elderly and Welfare. Also, she has attended to international conferences both as presenter and audience. Hazal has finished her master thesis about women with breast cancer and their caregivers based on a deep literature review and semi-structured in-depth interviews. She discussed experiences, needs and expectations of women with breast cancer and caregivers and tried to recommend evidence based health and social policies. Now she gained the scholarship program provided by the Ministry of National Education of Turkey which will cover her expenses during her PhD education.  Her interests are Social Policy, Health Policy, Gender, Aging, Palliative Care, Family Policies, and Disparities in Health Care.  E-mail: ercinh@uw.edu


Taurmini Fentress earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Oregon. While completing this degree, Taurmini worked in the anthropology department on projects relating to food insecurity, poverty, culture, policy, and food choice in district elementary and middle schools. This research was dedicated to deepening the understanding of the relationships between food choice, food education, and school district policy and the impact this has on the health and wellbeing of children. After leaving the University of Oregon, she continued this work with a comparison study in Oviedo, Spain. Taurmini then came to the University of Washington where she completed her MSW and MPA while also working towards a graduate level certificate in Global Public Health specializing in women, adolescents, and children. She has been employed at the West Coast Poverty Center for the last three years where she has had the opportunity to continue working to bridge the gaps between research, policy, and practice. Taurmini’s long-term research interests are in stress and its effects on the body and mind across generations; she hopes to use stress as a through line linking individual experiences to culture and societal structures while exploring how interventions can be made at the population level. She is committed to transdisciplinary, multi-level, and impact-oriented work. E-mail: taurmini@uw.edu


Angela Fernandez is originally from the Menominee Indian Reservation in northeastern Wisconsin. She completed her BSW at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, where she interned in outpatient mental health and substance abuse services, and worked on an NIH study on women living with HIV as a Ronald E. McNair Scholar. She went on to gain her MSW at the University of Washington, where she gained practice experience as a medical social worker in inpatient psychiatry at Harborview Medical Center, while also working as a Research Assistant for the Indigenous Wellness Research Institute (IWRI) at the University of Washington. Upon graduation with her MSW, Angela began service as a Youth Development Worker in the Peace Corps, where she worked with Costa Rica’s national child welfare organization as well as local, county and provincial leaders on positive youth development, women’s empowerment, environmental education, violence, discrimination and HIV prevention in schools, and recreational activities for youth, adults and elders. Upon her return from the Peace Corps, Angela worked as a medical social worker and psychotherapist at a Federally Qualified Community Healthcare Center (FQHC) in Milwaukee's inner city, serving a diverse population of low-income, uninsured/underinsured patients including U.S. citizens and residents, and refugees, including a large population of undocumented Spanish-speaking people. Currently a fourth-year doctoral student, Angela’s research focus is on the social, historical, cultural and environmental determinants of health and human rights of Indigenous peoples. Her current research focuses on the role of place, culture and environment as protective factors in Indigenous health, with a specific focus on mental health, substance abuse, HIV and chronic disease prevention  Angela is a Ronald E. McNair Fellow, an Indigenous Substance Abuse, Medicines, and Addictions Research Training (ISMART) Program fellow, and a Minority Fellowship Program (MFP) fellow.  E-mail: angelaf2@uw.edu


Vern Harner, MSW, is a German-American trans and queer Social Welfare PhD student at the University of Washington. Over the past decade, Vern's work to improve the lives of trans individuals has focused on advocacy, community intervention/support, and training and education.  Their research trajectory focuses on the impact of explicit and implicit identity disclosure, as well as community-defined success in trans communities. Vern is part of the Aging with Pride: National Health, Aging, and Sexuality/Gender Study (NHAS) research team.  E-mail: vharner@uw.edu


Erin Harrop received her BS from the University of Washington in 2010, where she earned a Mary Gates Research Fellowship for her independent neuropsychology project on dopaminergic facilitation of learning and memory. She went on to receive her MSW from the University of Washington, after completing her Leadership and Education in Adolescent Health Fellowship in 2014. Erin’s focus on health risk behaviors has led her to serve as a research assistant at several research groups, including the Addictive Behaviors Research Center, the Center for Sexual Health and Risky Behaviors, and the Social Development Research Group. Her research interests concern the intersection of mental health and physical health, specifically in the areas of eating disorders, substance abuse, and weight-stigma. She sees weight-based discrimination as a critical, and often ignored, social justice issue, and her research agenda seeks to address this limitation by focusing on the systemic factors of weight-stigma which impact the recovery of eating disorder patients. She employs a critical feminist theory and anti-oppression lens to her work, as well as an explicit Health at Every Size approach to the promotion of health behaviors. Her research is informed by her clinical experience as medical social worker at Seattle Children’s Hospital where she has worked for the past four years. She is presently preparing for her qualifying paper which examines the experiences of higher-weight individuals with restrictive eating disorders.  E-mail: erind2@uw.edu


Matt Ignacio is an enrolled tribal member of the Tohono O’odham Nation. For the past 15 years, he has worked in the HIV/AIDS arena as a national trainer, direct service provider and technical assistance provider. Having worked primarily with American Indian/Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian (Native) Communities, his work has largely focused on: advocating for Native LGBTQ/Two-Spirit issues, addressing the needs of injection drug users in Native communities, advocating for drug user health and justice, and increasing community engagement in HIV clinical trials.  His academic career includes an MSW degree from Columbia University, a BA in Sociology degree from University of California in Santa Barbara, and 2 years of undergraduate studies at the College of Santa Fe in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Matt is interested in increasing healthcare access and utilization, as well as improving culturally respectful service delivery for Native people and other underserved/marginalized populations. He also wants to help build upon and increase trusting and meaningful relationships between researchers and Native communities.  E-mail: matt717@uw.edu


Ian Johnson received a B.A. in Sociology/Gender Studies from Ithaca College and an M.S.W. with a specialization in Gerontology from CUNY Hunter. He began working with older adults as a nurse's aide in an assisted living facility while in college and developed a research interest in the intersections of gender and aging. In the past seven years, he has worked as a clinical social worker in community-based organizations aimed at addressing the mental health needs of older adults across New York City. Currently, he supervises home-based mental health, peer services, case management, and nursing for older adults with severe mental illness living in the supportive housing system. His current research interests include marginalization and stigma within senior communities, LGBTQ older adults, and the development of mental health and substance use interventions for aging populations. E-mail: ianmj@uw.edu


Jessica Lapham received a B.A. in Communication from the University of Southern California and a M.S.W. with an emphasis in Organizational Leadership and Policy Planning from the University of Denver. While she has worked in the non-profit sector in a variety of roles for nearly ten years, it wasn’t until she began youth mentoring and teaching yoga to at-risk youth in the Boulder and Denver County Juvenile Justice Systems that her desire to pursue a career in social work was ignited. Jessica focused her graduate studies on macro practice & theory, social policy analysis & advocacy, resource development & fundraising, and applied research & evaluation. She has held internships at Centura Health - St. Anthony’s Hospital providing SBIRT tests and treatment referrals to patients, as well as the Denver Botanic Garden implementing a horticulture therapy program for post 9/11 veterans. She has worked with a number of adaptive sports programs to provide outdoor therapy opportunities for individuals with disabilities by developing wellness interventions, conducting grant writing & fundraising initiatives, and designing program evaluations that effectively measure outcomes. Currently, she works at Western State Colorado University advising nearly 300 graduate students toward successful degree completion in addition to analyzing and reporting on program data for the Colorado Department of Education. Additionally, Jessica is a freelance grant writer and development strategist that works with a variety of non-profits to secure grant funding, design and implement effective program evaluations, report on outcomes, and consult on long-term fundraising strategies. Recently, she has been hired as an adjunct Instructor at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work, providing instruction in human behavior theory and social work framework applications to address current social justice challenges and diverse contexts. Jessica’s personal, professional and academic experiences have led to her research interests to understand and address health disparities, social determinants of health, and barriers to care as well as examine why some populations are healthier than others.  E-mail:  jlapham1@uw.edu 


Emily Loerzel is a White Earth Anishinaabekwe who received her BA in Sociology at Elmhurst College and her MSW at Aurora University. Prior to receiving her MSW, she worked as a case manager in the fields of chronic mental health management, homelessness, and domestic violence. She moved her focus to working within the Chicago American Indian community as a community organizer and a clinical mental health intern at Indian Health Services. In 2016, she co-wrote and developed a Dept. Of Justice grant called Project Beacon, a pilot grant oriented towards building up direct services and outreach for urban Native American survivors of human trafficking. This allowed her to educate community members and professionals on human trafficking as well as work alongside legal professionals and law enforcement in the city of Chicago. Her current research interests are developing community based interventions against human trafficking of Indigenous people, wellness of Indigenous women and adolescents, and violence against Indigenous communities.  E-mail:  eloerzel@uw.edu 


Moo-Hyun Kim received his BA in Social Welfare from the University of Seoul and his MSW at    Washington University in St. Louis. Throughout his BA and MSW, Moo-Hyun was involved in several research projects as a research assistant or practicum student responsible for background study, data collection, data analysis, or program evaluation. As an MSW student who specialized in research, he conducted an independent study examining community-level protective and risk factors for child maltreatment incidence. Currently, Moo-Hyun’s main research interests are neighborhood-level child maltreatment prevention and the measurement of child neglect and emotional abuse. He is also interested in applying GIS (Geographical Information System) to community-level child maltreatment research. At UW, he hopes to expand his understanding about family violence prevention and contribute to developing effective violence prevention strategies.  E-mail: mkim03@uw.edu


Angie Malorni received her Bachelor of Science in Psychology from the Ohio State University and a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Washington. She has been a youth worker for over 8 years and worked with the City of Seattle to design and facilitate Youth Participatory Program Evaluation for city-wide teen programs. She currently works for an after-school and OST intermediary organization, School's Out Washington, managing over 75 school-age and youth serving organizations through continuous program improvement processes. As part of that process, she facilitates peer-learning communities to improve capacity and support collaboration in the youth development field. She translates theory into practice by designing curriculum, training materials and workshops on service-learning, active-participatory approaches, social and emotional learning, racial and social justice, youth voice and positive youth development across King and Pierce counties. She is interested in utilizing mixed methods, CBPR and PAR to explore the ways SEL can support critical consciousness development in youth and young adults. She is also interested in contributing to the ongoing work of increasing equity, cultural responsiveness and justice into social science research methods and application. E-mail: malorni@uw.edu


Kristin McCowan received a BS in Psychology and a BA in English from Stephens College. She earned her MSW at the University of Missouri-Columbia.  Kristin has spent several years working with various vulnerable groups including persons with substance use disorders, persons with mental health disorders and adolescents with developmental disabilities. Her research interests include studying poverty and antipoverty policy because poverty is often cited as a root cause of other social problems. Kristin is especially interested in how poverty impacts the health and mental health status of minority populations.  E-mail: mccowank@uw.edu


Araceli Orozco-Hershey received her BA in Hispanic American Language and Literature at Universidad Autonoma de Baja California and completed her MSW at the University of Washington. She has worked in the field of social work over 10 years in the capacities of clinician, clinical and field supervisor, program developer, educator and researcher.  Her private practice specializes in immigrant mental health and crisis intervention.  Her teaching experience includes teaching graduate classes at Boston College where she customized the Human Behavior and Social Environment course to make it culturally and contextually congruent with the immigrant Latino population. In her current position of clinical supervisor at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, at Harvard Medical School, she launched the Latino MSW internship program and established the Post Master Community Engagement Fellowship for Latino social workers.  Araceli is interested in studying complex trauma in immigrant population, developing interventions to treat anxiety disorders in Latino immigrants and joining in efforts to create policies which improve healthcare access for immigrant populations.  E-mail: aorozco@uw.edu


Jessica Ramirez is a first-generation Xicana/Chicana college student from Oxnard, California. She completed her undergraduate studies in public health at California State University, Northridge and received a dual Master’s Degree in public health and social work from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She has worked with Children, Youth and Families of Color in various settings—including community centers, public housing communities, and schools. Because of her education, clinical experiences, and personal observations, she is passionate about and committed to social justice. More specifically, her interests revolve around working with underrepresented and underserved communities who are affected by incarceration, substance abuse, and violence. Her goal is to return to her community or communities alike to help shed light on and address the many social injustices that affect the well-being/health of underrepresented and underserved Communities of Color.  E-mail:  jr72@uw.edu


Rebecca Rebbe earned her MSW at Boston College and her master's in education in Risk & Prevention from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.  She has a bachelor's degree in social work from the University of Portland and has served as an AmeriCorps member working with adolescents. Rebecca has over 7 years post-MSW experience working with families involved with the child welfare system. She worked as an in-home family crisis clinician in Boston before working for the Washington State public child welfare system in Seattle as an ongoing case worker, a CPS investigator, and a permanency and adoptions supervisor with adolescents.  Rebecca is interested in research regarding the policies and laws of public child welfare.  E-mail: rebbe@uw.edu


Ashley Rousson earned a BA in Secondary Education from DePaul University in Chicago (‘07). She earned her MSW from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor (’13), where she studied interpersonal practice and mental health, and first became interested in the issue of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV).  She has since worked for Wellspring Family Services in Seattle in several direct service capacities in their counseling, Employee Assistance, and Domestic Violence Intervention programs.  Ashley developed her research skills throughout her MSW and beyond serving as a research assistant for several professors, completing a pre-doctoral fellowship at the Michigan Institute for Clinical and Health Research (MICHR), and co-authoring a note from practice that was published in Violence Against Women, in 2015. Ashley’s research interests center around violence and victimization. In particular, she is interested in IPV perpetration, and women’s use of force/violence, especially “victim-defendants”. She is interested in examining the direct service prevention and intervention approaches we utilize to address IPV and these populations, including criminal justice responses.  E-mail: arousson@uw.edu


Chiho Song completed his BA (2005) and MSW (2007) at Seoul National University, Korea, and since graduating has worked as a researcher at the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs in the Division of Basic Social Security Research where he was involved in a variety of research projects associated with poverty measurement, collecting information on poverty-related factors, and analyzing the outcomes of policy activation for improving the status of marginalized social groups. His primary research interest lies in how poverty is measured and what impact policies have on it — how existing social mechanisms influence poverty. He is interested in quantitative studies for measuring poverty and developing anti-poverty strategies, in estimating the national minimum living cost, and disentangling the determinants of poverty and its effects on socioeconomic status of the underprivileged with a focus on linking research to policy and examining how research results are used by policy makers. His goal is to do in-depth research on the determinants of economic vulnerability and the effects on the disadvantaged.  E-mail: chsong79@uw.edu


Claire Willey Sthapit received her BA in Anthropology from the College of Wooster, OH, and an MSSW with Certification in Marriage and Family Therapy from the University of Louisville, KY. Through her work as a couples therapist in Washington, D.C. and Kathmandu, Nepal, Claire perceived a need for more comprehensive and tailored strategies to support persons affected by domestic violence. From 2010 to 2013, she worked with a non-governmental organization in Pokhara, Nepal that does community based work around issues of human rights and the psychosocial well-being of marginalized women, children, and their families. There she facilitated two rounds of a course in psychosocial counseling and provided clinical supervision to counselors and social mobilizers. Inspired by this organization's multilayered participatory approach to violence prevention and intervention, Claire is interested in strategies to engage communities for addressing domestic violence and other issues of concern to them. Since the earthquake struck Nepal in spring 2015, she has become increasingly interested in the role of community participation for disaster reconstruction, as well as reducing the risk of interpersonal violence and trauma post-disaster.  E-mail: clairews@uw.edu


Jessica Saniguq Ullrich has a BA from Gonzaga University and MSW from University of Alaska Anchorage. Jessica’s research interests include Alaska Native kinship care, Indian child welfare policy implementation, and primary prevention intervention development that centers on Alaska Native cultural values and practices. Jessica worked in child welfare for 11 years in positions ranging from visitation supervisor, permanency worker, in-home services case manager, ICWA Specialist, and supervisor of the first Alaska Native Family Services unit in Anchorage, Alaska. Jessica is committed to moving forward racial equity and social justice dialogues in the classroom, in research, and through political advocacy.  E-mail: jullrich@uw.edu


Thomas Walton earned a BA degree in Sociology, with a minor in Women’s and Gender Studies, from the University of Texas at Austin.  Afterwards, he began his social work career as a case manager and HIV testing coordinator for street-dependent adolescents.  A couple years later, he relocated to Seattle and became involved in human-subjects research at the University of Washington, collecting data for the Social Development Research Group at schools throughout the US and conducting in-home assessments with older adults with dementia and their caregivers for the School of Nursing.  In 2008, Tom entered the University of Washington’s MSW program where he focused on policy with internships at OPEIU 8 (a union organizing social workers) and King County Mental Health.  For the past five years, he has served as the Project Director for the Warrior Check-Up Study -- a randomized controlled trial of a substance use intervention for active-duty Army personnel -- at the Innovative Programs Research Group.  During that time, he has worked closely with many soldiers in crisis who sought help from the study because they perceived it to be their only means to confidential support.  In his research career, he hopes to explore some of the concerns commonly raised by these soldiers: “moral injury” as it relates to PTSD symptomatology, suicidal ideation and community reintegration; as well as, the intersections of sexual orientation, masculinity, violence and stigma.  Additionally, Tom is interested in the implementation of evidence-based practices, policy, and the economics of social work and behavioral public health.  E-mail: towalton@uw.edu


Yuanjin Zhou earned a Bachelor of Law degree in Social Work from the Xiamen University in China (2012). During her undergraduate study, she travelled around China, participating in several social work programs in different cities/rural areas. Her practice experience includes working with migrant workers and their family, community-dwelling elderly, survivors of the fateful Wenchuan earthquake, and youth volunteers. Then, Yuanjin is committed to promoting positive social change in China through conducting rigorous research to inform practice and policy-making procedures. After entering the master program of sociology (with a minor in social work research), Yuanjin has been working with a practice research team in Xiamen University, which its primary research interests focus on developing community- and home-based services for the elderly. Hired by Xiahui Social Service Agency for the Elderly as a practice researcher, Yuanjin was involved a variety of research projects, including those related to interprofessional collaboration, intergenerational education, health promotion, community-based stroke care and community-based dementia care. With these preliminary explorations, Yuanjin is focusing her research on how to integrate social and health care services for the elderly, especially those with chronic diseases (for example, dementia), in different countries. She is particularly interested in understanding the relationship between research and practice, and developing innovative research methodologies to integrate research procedures into real practice settings.  E-mail: yjzhou@uw.edu